Sep
19
9:30 AM09:30

A Traditional Oktoberfest

In preparation for our first annual Oktoberfest on Saturday, 9/21, we sat down with Burke Dignam, our resident Lab Manager, to dive into the traditional recipe we chose for this year’s inaugural event beer.

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Tell us a little about your German background.

I don’t actually have any German ancestors HA!, however I do have strong ties to Germany. My wife is German and we have been together for over 15 years. I lived in Germany for 8 years, primarily in Duesseldorf and Munich, working as an apprentice brewer and professional brewer. Before moving back to America, I graduated as a Braumeister from Doemens, a Brewmaster school just outside of Munich. There I had a few opportunities to visit the Oktoberfest tents.

What is a Wiesnbier? How does it differ from the more widespread Märzen?

A Wiesnbier is the beer served at Oktoberfest in Munich. A Maerzen is a traditional Festbier that is served at various festivals in Germany throughout the year.

Due to the lack of refrigeration in earlier times, a Bavarian Ordinance was set into place that said you could only brew between September 29th and April 23rd. Beer brewed in March (Maerz) was brewed slightly stronger than usual to last until the early Autumn months. Because of this, the Oktoberfestbier used to be a Maerzen. However, today the breweries serving at the infamous Munich Oktoberfest brew a paler, more bitter (for German standards) beer they call Wiesnbier… because the area in Munich where this is being served is called the Wiesn.    

Personally, I think a Wiesnbier is more drinkable for an event like Oktoberfest, particularly when you’re drinking 6-7 Maß over a 10 hour period.

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Is there anything unique in regards to the recipe or process behind our Wiesenbier?

We’ve tried to keep the recipe simple; I think that’s part of the beauty of German beer (and cuisine). We used primarily German Pilsner Malt with a little bit of Munich and Wiener malt to add depth. Spalter hops were used to give a classic noble hop character. Finally, we gave the beer extended lagering time in traditional horizontal lagering tanks to smooth out the flavor.

Why does brewing this style of beer make sense now for Trillium?

Being a brewery founded in community experiences, what better way is there to bring people together than an event like Oktoberfest? I also think we have a diverse team with an array of knowledge and experience that we want to share with our community.

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How does serving from a gravity cask, like the ones we’ll be pouring from at Oktoberfest, effect the beer and/or drinking experience?

Serving from cask is a more traditional method of serving beer that has become more of a history lesson. The oldest brewery in Munich, Augustiner (1328), is the only brewery serving their beer at the Wiesn from traditional casks. This takes a lot of hard work to execute as these casks are filled and moved around all by hand.

There is actually very little flavor impact since the casks are typically pitched (coated with resin), so there is no direct contact with wood. That being said, hearing the barrels roll along the floor and seeing the faucets driven into the cask creates a nostalgic, community atmosphere and brings everyone closer to the beer. This is an experience we’d like to share with everyone… if we don’t mess it up!!

To learn more about our 2019 Oktoberfest, which is taking place in Fort Point, Canton, and in front of the soon-to-open Trillium Fenway, click here.

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Sep
17
9:00 AM09:00

Olmsted's Emerald Necklace

Today we’re proud to introduce a new series of beers that tell another story from Trillium’s earliest days. If you’ve visited Boston, you may have driven past or walked through a section of the Emerald Necklace: a 1,100 acre, seven-mile-long public park system that is a cherished green sanctuary in the heart of our city.

Map Courtesy Emerald Necklace Conservancy

Map Courtesy Emerald Necklace Conservancy

Frederick Law Olmsted is the prolific landscape architect responsible for some of the most significant preservation efforts and park projects in the U.S., including Yosemite National Park, Central Park, and the U.S. Capitol grounds. From 1878-1896, Olmsted worked on what he considered to be the most important project of his career: Boston’s Emerald Necklace. Beginning downtown at the Boston Common and Public Garden, extending out to Back Bay, and all the way to Dorchester, the six-park system encompasses an arboretum, a zoo, and countless picturesque views that Boston residents and visitors alike enjoy every day.

JC’s hop bines at plot M20 in the Fenway Victory Gardens

JC’s hop bines at plot M20 in the Fenway Victory Gardens

Trillium’s roots can be traced back to the Emerald Necklace, specifically The Back Bay Fens, where founder JC Tetreault cultivated his tiny oasis in the Fenway Victory Gardens, the oldest continuously operating victory gardens in the United States. In the seven years that he lovingly cared for his assigned 16’ by 24’ lot (a space slightly larger than our original Congress Street shop!), JC grew a variety of edible and decorative plants, as well as some young trees which have since been transplanted to his parents’ home. As an obsessive gardener, passionate home cook, and budding homebrewer (he grew hops as well), the numbered ‘M20’ plot allowed JC to keep his hands in the earth and on the path that would lead him to founding Trillium Brewing Company with Esther.

The Victory Gardens are a mere ten minute walk from the soon-to-open Trillium Fenway, our year round, greenhouse-inspired taproom and retail space. Trillium Fenway’s impending opening is the perfect time to launch the Emerald Necklace series and it’s only fitting that we kick things off with The Fens, brewed with the incredibly vibrant and aromatic duo of Mosaic and Galaxy hops.

Cans of The Fens will be available at open in both Fort Point and Canton on Tuesday, 9/17. We will donate $1 from every pint and $2 from every 4 pack sold of this release of The Fens to the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, which advocates for, maintains, restores, and programs the parks. Until then, stay tuned for updates on Trillium Fenway because Opening Day is just around the corner...


Cheers!

Team Trillium


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A Trip to Sid Wainer & Son
Jun
6
11:30 AM11:30

A Trip to Sid Wainer & Son

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The average New Englander may not know it, but one of the region’s havens of specialty food is nestled just inland from the Acushnet River in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Sid Wainer & Son began curating and distributing the finest produce and goods over 100 years ago. In the time since, the Wainer family has grown the company into a bastion of quality - working with farmers, small producers and artisans across the world. Before we even opened the doors at Trillium Fort Point, we knew we’d be working extensively with the Sid Wainer team. They’ve helped us access a variety of fruit, veggies and specialty goods, produced the right way and brought to life on our ever-changing menu. Daily deliveries from Sid Wainer fuel our cheese selections, highlight our seasonal salads and add bright, delicious flavor to our main courses.

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The Sid Wainer team’s work extends beyond just the realm of distribution. Farm Manager Ben Comeau directs the production of an assortment of herbs, vegetables and flowers from a greenhouse in New Bedford and the Wainer Family Farm in Dartmouth, MA. Walking between rows of veggies and sampling herbs while Ben describes his projects, it’s easy to feel the passion for agriculture radiating through everything Sid Wainer does.

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Located on a quiet, pasture-laden street just off Buzzard’s Bay, the Wainer Family Farm feels all at once rustic and innovative. Here, Ben cultivates an assortment of crops, while fine tuning production techniques and methods. We found ourselves positively energized by the sight of rows of shishito peppers starting to grow in the greenhouse, or the kale plants starting to dot the farm beds. Visiting those who help us create our menu is not just educational for our team, it helps reconnect us with the origins of our work. This in turn brings into focus our current impact on the farming and food community and helps shape the plans for our own farm in North Stonington.

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To cap off our visit, Chef Morway from Trillium Fort Point hopped into the kitchen at the homestead on the farm to create a dish that’s near and dear to us. Griddled cornbread with burrata, fresh fruit, and honey. The burrata is one of our favorite offerings from Sid Wainer, and while we’ve been known to snack on it by itself, it really shines in this dish that has been on our menu since day one. As we continue to develop recipes showcasing intentionally crafted food, we look forward to the little moments of inspiration that Sid Wainer’s offerings bring us. It’s a joy to see their many projects in action, and an honor to call them our partners.

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Pre-Ordering Beer for Pickup
Jun
6
10:30 AM10:30

Pre-Ordering Beer for Pickup

We’re excited to roll out a new way for you all to bring home our beers. Select offerings will now be available to purchase on our webstore, for pickup at either Trillium Canton or Trillium Fort Point. We’re currently offering three rotating options, with more to come down the line - hit the link below to grab yours, and please read the FAQs below

  • Be sure to select your pickup location when checking out.

  • Orders may be picked up immediately after purchase.

  • One allotment per person. Duplicate orders will be canceled (gotta be fair!)

  • When picking up please bring a valid photo ID that matches the purchasing name. No proxy pickups. You must be 21+ to pick up. 

  • Bottles must be picked up within a week of ordering, otherwise they will be returned to stock and you will be issued a partial refund. Any orders that are not picked up within a week are subject to a $5 restocking fee. Please contact us at beerpickup@trilliumbrewing.com prior to the end of the week deadline if your plans change and you need to make a new arrangement.

  • You're more than welcome to add on other beers, merchandise or growlers when picking up. We'll just have to run a new sale for you.

  • All bottles are subject to availability. If a product appears as sold out, then we don't have any more available! We're unable to guarantee that these offerings will last.

  • We worked hard to make this beer for you and we would love for you to enjoy it. We ask that you do not re-sell it.


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A Mug Full of History (...and delicious lager)
May
2
7:00 AM07:00

A Mug Full of History (...and delicious lager)

Introducing Permutation 6.07: New England Corn Lager! The delicious mug is full of more than just beer - it represents the history of the region’s agriculture, and some new lessons about the role corn can take in a lager (because let’s be honest, the topic has quite the flashpoint).

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This story starts at Plimoth Plantation on the South Shore of Massachusetts. Growing up in the area surely meant a field trip to this living museum, where the buildings and activities recreate 17th-century life. The Plimoth Grist Mill sits adjacent to Town Brook on the original Jenney Grist Mill (erected in 1636).

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Inside, millers Matt Tavares and Kim VanWormer operate the fully functioning mill to grind organic corn on 200-year-old millstones. The delicious, fragrant corn milled here is organic, fresh and locally grown - worlds away from the heavily processed syrup you may think of when you hear the word corn. Listening to Matt talk about driving out to Four Star Farms in Western Mass to pick up the harvested corn, then watching Kim leverage the stones into place, pour the raw corn, and run the processed cornmeal through her hands - it reminds us of the tactile connection to ingredients that producers have had for centuries.

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To honor and showcase this historic process, we’ve utilized Plimoth’s cornmeal in a number of our dishes at Trillium Fort Point. From a piece of cornbread nestled next to burrata and fresh fruit, to a savory crouton dotting our baby gem salad, you can find the product of Matt and Kim’s hard work highlighting our menu.

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Permutation 6.07 is a further extension of this partnership. On a crisp winter morning, Ryan and Steve added pounds and pounds of freshly milled corn to the mash of a new lager recipe. Almost two months of lagering in our horizontal tanks brought this concept to the glass, and today we’re proud to pour growlers at both locations. The raw, organic corn imparts a snappy, refreshing sweetness to underscore the subtle floral zestiness that the rest of the recipe brings. We hope you enjoy the taste of New England agriculture, hand grown and created with respect to history and dedication to the future!

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Wheat You Can Eat...And Drink
Apr
15
7:00 AM07:00

Wheat You Can Eat...And Drink

Today we are excited to showcase another wonderful local partner of ours - One Mighty Mill. Our collaborative IPA, Past, Present, Pretzel, is newly canned and ready for you to taste, but the story is more than just a beer release.

Located just north of Boston in the town of Lynn, One Mighty Mill is a different kind of bakery than you may be used to. The delicious bagels, pretzels and tortillas that they churn out are all made from wheat that’s grown pesticide-free in Linneaus, Maine then milled right on site in Lynn. Upon hearing about their “Wheat You Can Eat” we were intrigued to learn more about the process and see if we might be able to work together - so we headed up North to watch and sample.

Co-Founder and Head Baker Tony Rosenfeld - the Mill looks out on Exchange Street in downtown Lynn

Co-Founder and Head Baker Tony Rosenfeld - the Mill looks out on Exchange Street in downtown Lynn

The approach that the One Mighty Mill team takes is exceptional because their farming and milling processes preserve the wheat’s bran and germ - nutrient dense parts of the plant that industrially-processed flour is stripped of for the sake of shelf-stability. At the same time, the sustainable growing techniques practiced in Maine preserve chemical-free crops and work to bring wheat farming back to the region. The baked goods and flour that the OMM team are bringing to Massachusetts don’t just taste good, they’re better for us - the energy at the mill and bakery are living proof of that.  

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Chef Tony’s eponymous mill is an important part of creating fresh, nutrient dense wheat flour. The trade-off is that stone milling is not entirely efficient - a small part of the bran is unable to be broken down by the mill, and becomes a byproduct of the process. This material, called “middlings”, is dense in protein and micronutrients, and the One Mighty Mill team was determined to keep it in the food system rather than dispose of it. The idea to use the middlings as a beer ingredient came from Farmer Matt Williams of Maine, a friend of One Mighty Mill’s who has helped bring wheat farming back to New England. After speaking with the OMM team, we decided to try incorporating middlings into the mash step of brewing, where the starches can be converted and the bran can perform like raw wheat would. Our lab team tested extraction, starch conversion and flavor presentation prior to brewing, and positive results led to the use of middlings in Permutation 75, a Belgian IPA brewed at Trillium Fort Point. We also incorporated One Mighty Mill’s wheat middles into our recipe for The Six States stout as a part of our New England showcase. Happy with our results so far, we set out to create a concept for a larger scale recipe.

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Which brings us to Past, Present, Pretzel. This IPA features a hefty amount of wheat middlings from One Mighty Mill along with Two Row (our standard pale malt), while the hop bill is 100% Citra. The team from One Mighty Mill took their own field trip down to Trillium Canton to check out our brewery and help us add the feature product.

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Through this delicious collaboration we celebrate conservation and a symbiotic relationship between miller and brewer. The project started with wheat grown in Maine and milled in Mass (“past”), it became a juicy, crisp IPA that you’re drinking or soon to drink (“present”), and post-brew-day we sent the spent grain back up to Lynn for the baking crew to make pretzels out of (“pretzel”). Along with showcasing a fun and engaging new recipe, we hope Past, Present, Pretzel gives us all a chance to think about local systems and economies that are supported by creative conservation.

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Making New Homes in Familiar Places
Mar
28
3:30 PM15:30

Making New Homes in Familiar Places

Exciting plans can be so hard to keep to yourself! We’ve been working on a couple of special projects for a while and the time has FINALLY come to share them with you...

Later this year we’ll be bringing Trillium to a brand new neighborhood. Trillium Fenway will be a unique year-round indoor/outdoor brewery and taproom featuring draft beers, retail cans and bottles to go, access to food from Time Out Market, and landmark city views all from an innovative, greenhouse-inspired structure on the front lawn of 401 Park.

Today we’re also officially announcing our plans for the future of our flagship production brewery in Canton. With dreams of more space and the type of taproom experience we all want to enjoy, we’ll be spending the next couple years preparing to move across town into a building we’re calling our Forever Home. Trillium Canton’s new location will be just off Rt. 93 with views of Great Blue Hill.

We’re pretty much bursting with anticipation for the future of these two spaces. For more than just the facts, read on as we put our enthusiasm into words.

TRILLIUM FENWAY

There’s no question that the Fenway is an iconic part of Boston culture. Along with the stadium, the neighborhood is home to blossoming agriculture and tranquil greenery by way of The Fenway Victory Gardens and The Emerald Necklace. It also just so happens to be the neighborhood where Trillium co-founders JC and Esther Tetreault met and became the young dumb couple in love that started a brewery together. We’ve watched the neighborhood grow over the last decade with access to more great food, improved transportation, more fun-loving residents, and new businesses bringing new life to the Fenway. Being a part of this lush pocket in the city will give us a new way to bring people together.

Trillium Fenway will be our first ground up construction project. The 1,500 square foot structure, designed with us by Studio Troika, will blur the lines between outdoor beer garden and cozy indoor taproom. From the greenhouse-inspired space, we’ll watch the seasons change through the year - hanging out on the open-air patio in the summer and watching the snow shimmer through glass windows in the winter. In addition to the design of Trillium Fenway, we love that it’s conveniently located and public transit accessible, open year-round, and nestled into a historic area that is constantly bustling with sports, arts, and cultural activities. Our brewery was born in Boston, and our newest space in the city will set those roots deeper.

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TRILLIUM CANTON

Down in Canton, we’ve spent almost five years getting to know and love our humble, industrial space on Shawmut Rd. As we’ve grown, we’ve outgrown the space and are currently operating out of four separate facilities to maintain our production, taproom, barrel-aging, laboratory, office, and warehouse operations. Our crew works super hard to create the best experience we can for our guests, but we dream of doing better with a new custom-built facility. The move to our Forever Home will open new doors for hospitality, while unifying our team and operations under one roof.

This next step is all about refining and expanding on the vision that we set out to create for Trillium Canton. Expect an elevated taproom/patio experience for enjoying your beers, an easier process for grabbing something to share at home, more space for on-site events, and a restaurant to fill your stomach with more than beer. All this will happen adjacent to a streamlined, modern brewery that will keep our production team together creating boundary-pushing beers.

The move to our permanent home isn’t quite a grab-the-keys-and-go situation. We’ll be gradually building out the space and moving our operations there in a stepwise function. For now, we’re looking forward to a fun summer on the patio at Shawmut Road. Stay tuned to our Trillium Canton Instagram, Twitter and Facebook for updates as we share our progress over the next couple years.

It goes without saying, but our whole crew is buckling our collective seatbelt for an exhilarating, collaborative journey towards these two locations. We couldn’t do it without you, and we can’t wait to fling the doors open for you. Let’s get to work!

Cheers,

Team Trillium

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Pouring Traditional Lagers
Mar
25
9:30 AM09:30

Pouring Traditional Lagers

If you’ve stopped by Trillium Fort Point in the past couple of weeks, you may have noticed a little something new behind the bar. As part of our ongoing quest to create the ideal on-site experience, we recently installed new Czech-inspired side pull faucets to pour our lagers with.

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This project has been in the works since we collaborated with our friends from Notch Brewing on I Predict A Riot last winter. The release of that pale lager at our Roslindale beer garden allowed us to test out the appropriate faucets for the beer, and we were extremely happy with the results.

Our first foray into side pull faucets at the Roslindale Substation

Our first foray into side pull faucets at the Roslindale Substation

We enlisted the talented crew from Modern Draught to outfit our U.S. standard taps with special, fabricated adapters in order to accommodate the side-pull faucets. Just one of the many customizations they’ve expertly executed for us - expect a deeper dive on how they’ve helped perfect our draft systems coming in the future!

Why the special faucet for lagers? These new taps are outfitted with an internal screen that creates dense and long-lasting foam, ensuring that a creamy, soft head sits atop every mug that we pour.

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Pouring beer on these faucets is a bit of a different practice than the standard plunger-style tap. Our bar staff took the time to practice on a good number of pilsners to add this skill to their tool belts. As they pour off of our side pull faucets, you’ll see them submerge the head of the faucet - an integral step in dictating the creamy foam. Side pull faucets are easily removed and sanitized, so we can care for them on a daily basis. It’s a bit of extra work, but to us it’s worth the investment in a quality pour.

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We hope you’re enjoying the ongoing expansion of our lager program as much as we are. These lower ABV, traditionally-inspired options like our Pilsner are the perfect choice for those in search of a flavorful, easy-drinking and refreshing beer. With this latest upgrade to our bar program, we continue on our mission to present lagers to you in their optimal form and we hope you can join us for a mug soon.

Cheers,

Team Trillium

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Permutation's New Look
Mar
22
4:00 PM16:00

Permutation's New Look

While planning our celebration of Trillium’s first six years, we decided to team up with our friends at Fair Folk to take a fresh look at how we present our Permutation series beers. We initially set out to build a brewer’s playground - a series where we could experiment with new ideas and concepts, all based around the desire to highlight the styles and ingredients that were on our minds at any given moment. Over the course of 75+ releases that concept has strengthened itself as we’ve grown. Our new production facility at Trillium Fort Point has allowed Lead Brewer Ryan Gillette to pioneer a whole host of new recipes, while we continue to explore and tinker in Canton. The number of Permutations is rising and before it gets deep into the hundreds, we’re going to do a little reframing.

Ryan Gillette on our Fort Point brewhouse

Ryan Gillette on our Fort Point brewhouse

Filipe Garcia working in the wild beer cellar

Filipe Garcia working in the wild beer cellar

Today we’re unveiling a new outfit and language for our Permutation series beers. The goal of this change is two-fold. First, we hope that a bit of distinction within the series will help our loyal drinkers keep track of which recipes they enjoyed, while comparing similar styles to learn more about what resonates with them. Second, we hope to add a sense of time and place to these beers. Permutations exist once for a short amount of time, and while the recipe may be brought back as a larger batch, we hope to capture the excitement of sipping a creative offering that can only be experienced once.

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Our new naming format will track Permutation releases by year and recipe number. Given that we are kicking off our sixth year, Permutation beers will start with a number 6 until March 2020 (when we’ll move to 7… should be simple enough!). Recipes will count up from 01 throughout the year, before resetting next March 21st at Permutation 7.01.

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To kick it all off, we’re releasing Permutation 6.01 today! This sessionable, low ABV stout was brewed at Trillium Fort Point by Ryan and Steve. The beer celebrates our Sixth Anniversary by once again showcasing the wonderful bounty of the New England region. Permutation 6.01 features a malt bill made up of grain grown and malted in Maine and Massachusetts, with hops from Western Mass. This session stout is designed to bring forward the enticing, decadent qualities of the higher gravity dark beers we release, while staying at an ABV humble enough (3.2) that you can say “yes” to a second or third glass. Permutation 6.01 will be on for growler fills at both breweries today as part of our Anniversary celebration. We look forward to sharing this and many more beer-filled moments with you in the coming years!

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A Level Seesaw on the Brewing Playground
Mar
6
3:00 PM15:00

A Level Seesaw on the Brewing Playground

Over the last few weeks, the women of Trillium came together to learn, discuss and create our second annual Pink Boots Collaboration beer to celebrate International Women’s Day (this Friday March 8). The Pink Boots Society is a non-profit organization created to assist, inspire and encourage women beer industry professionals to advance their careers through education.

In asking the question: “Who are we?”

they start with the response: “We are the female movers and shakers in the beer industry.”

We, the female professionals at Trillium, decided to define who we are.

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During our brew day, we shared some thoughts about our roles at Trillium and in our professional histories, as well as for the future of female-identifying individuals in craft beer. We came together as a group, from across our multiple locations and a range of departments: hospitality, production, finance, HR, marketing, safety, and programming (to name a few). A persistent thread in our conversation was that we, as women at Trillium, feel welcome regardless of gender. What an incredibly unique feeling to share at a workplace, especially in a male-dominated industry!

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The strong and vocal community we’ve built at Trillium gives us a platform and a responsibility to share our message. We unequivocally promote inclusivity and equal opportunity. Our belief is that the beer industry is for everyone, no matter where you come from, what gender you identify as, or what your area of expertise is.

At Trillium, the women on staff come from all walks of life and participate in a variety of roles necessary to produce and share craft beer. Some of us have been industry professionals for a number of years, others have found a way to turn passionate hobbies into careers. Some of us came from an entirely different field, drawn to the industry, and Trillium in particular, for its hospitality and sense of community. We have found a warm and welcoming home. We appreciate the fact that Trillium provides us with an environment where we can contribute our diverse talents, male or female. Empowering individuals, rather than genders, allows us to grow and be our best as a team. We see this as a level playing field for all; a team where people are welcome to try new things, and succeed in all parts of the business.  

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There are so many critical roles necessary to create and share each and every beer we proudly present to you. May, our Quality Assurance Lab Technician; Elinor, our Merchandise Coordinator; Leighann, our Bar Manager; Leah, our Graphic Designer; and Alexx, one of our amazing Fort Point servers - are just a few of the talented women who help us operate as a team, creating a complex business that spans many disciplines at multiple locations all working to bring you amazing beer. Not every organization has the same values or structure, but here at Trillium our “women at work” collaborate on a level playing field. The first release of our 2019 Pink Boots collaborations is designed to show just that.

Sensory tasting led by our QA Technician, May

Sensory tasting led by our QA Technician, May

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Level Playing Field is a spin-off of our beloved and refreshing Double Seesaw gose series, brewed with passion fruit, prickly pear and dragon fruit. Our standard Seesaw labels depict a seesaw (or two or three) positioned on a natural angle. We decided to change it up a bit. Level Playing Field shows two balanced seesaws representing the balance of gender at Trillium, and to show how proud we are to work here. This inclusivity is something that not only we, the women of Trillium take pride in, but the men feel as well.

So, should you ask: “Who are we?”

We will tell you: “We are proud members of the Trillium team and the craft beer industry. We are talented, experienced, hard-working, and fun. We are critical to our company’s success. And yeah...we’re women, too.”

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Level Playing Field will be released on Friday, March 8th, International Women’s Day, to celebrate all the women in the industry and Trillium’s ongoing efforts to create a fair and prosperous work environment for all. The beer will be available in cans and on draft, with a portion of the proceeds benefiting Pink Boots Society. To learn more about Pink Boots visit them on their website.

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The level seesaw you see on the label was illustrated by our in-house graphic designer, Leah. She put her own spin on the design that adorns the rest of the labels in this series. A couple of Leah’s other recent projects include our collaboration teku with Equilibrium Brewery and the eye-catching digital displays in our Canton taproom.

On Friday, March 8th, please join us to celebrate the release and to have a beer with our co-founder Esther Tetreault at our taproom in Canton. More info about that meetup can be found on our website.

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Cheers,

Team Trillium


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Cradles to Crayons - 2018 Donations
Nov
27
4:00 PM16:00

Cradles to Crayons - 2018 Donations

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For the third year running, we'll be spending the holiday season collecting clothing donations for Cradles to Crayons to help children in need. C2C is a wonderful organization that provides children from 0-12, living in homeless or low-income situations, with the essential items they need to thrive.

From Tuesday 11/27 to Monday 12/31 we'll be accepting new and gently used clean clothing for donation at both of our breweries. In return for each item donated, we'll present you with a raffle ticket for a drawing at the beginning of next year.

A list of potential donations include:

  • New or gently used bottoms, tops, outerwear, pajamas, & accessories

  • Children’s sizes 0-20 & child appropriate adult clothing size S - M

[Please note socks, underwear & pajamas must be new]

Five lucky raffle winners will be presented with a $100 gift card to Trillium. Thank you for you generous contributions to this important cause! 

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An Update from Trillium
Nov
26
5:00 PM17:00

An Update from Trillium

To our customers, friends, and family:

We’ve seen the recent social media commentary from our community. We have read and discussed every post, comment, and critique.

We opened Trillium in 2013 with three people and a dream of brewing exceptional beer to share with our local community. We did not know how it would turn out, but we were passionate and persevered. The idea that we might eventually build a company with a team of hundreds whom we would consider family at that point was still a dream. Now we are a passionate crew of 286 and could not have grown so fast in just five years without our exceptional team and loyal customers, and we could not be more grateful.

We would like to address recent comments regarding our employment practices. The conversation regarding tip-based wages is a long-running restaurant consideration, but is now also relevant in the young craft brewery retail industry. Five years ago we adopted this model and have watched the industry around us grow largely in the same way. Whether or not this model is the ideal model for our industry as a whole has been a topic of debate recently, and we want to be part of the discussion as the industry matures and moves forward with more amazing local craft breweries opening up every year. We have already spoken with the Massachusetts Brewers’ Guild to begin a discussion locally in our state, to start the conversation, and help each other identify best practices for the benefit of our employees and our customers. 

We pay our team in accordance with typical standards in the craft beer industry and with state and federal wage and hour laws. Feedback on our model from our staff has been overwhelmingly positive. We listen to feedback and try to respond quickly to improve the experience for our team and our customers. We opened Fort Point just one month ago and, in that process, some of our tenured retail staff were given a lower rate than they had previously been making. We have since met with those team members and reinstated their original rate. We have also reached out to our entire staff to discuss the situation, address any questions regarding compensation and benefits, and ask for their feedback, as it is critical to our success.

We apologize that this has caused any of our employees, customers or friends to doubt, in any way, the integrity of Trillium or their ongoing support of us. We are fortunate that we've assembled such a talented team and remain committed to brewing exceptional beer that we can share with our family, friends, and customers.

- Trillium Brewing Company

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Deciduous 2018: American Strong Ale with Fig, Cacao Nibs and Vanilla
Nov
13
6:00 AM06:00

Deciduous 2018: American Strong Ale with Fig, Cacao Nibs and Vanilla

Here in New England we have the joy of welcoming a fall season unlike anywhere else in the world. Each year as the leaves change, we bring forth a new batch of Deciduous. This beer is a celebration of seasonality and our dynamic climate - with a recipe that evolves year-to-year.

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Deciduous 2018 is an American strong ale brewed with fig, cacao nibs and Madagascar vanilla. With this year’s release coming later in the fall, our recipe leans a little more towards comfort and decadence. We believe this is the perfect beer to break out after a meal and share with the table, or to toast around the warmth of a late fall campfire. The 750ml bottle is meant for elegance and communal enjoyment.

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This recipe is highlighted by our local partner, Goodnow Farms Chocolate from Sudbury, MA. Nestled in the quiet woods of the Boston suburbs, Goodnow creates beautiful, single-origin chocolate using cacao sourced from Mexico and Central America. They have won Academy of Chocolate Awards, Northwest Chocolate Festival Awards and Good Food Awards for their creations.

Monica Rogan, co-owner of Goodnow Farms, inspects cacao beans at the source

Monica Rogan, co-owner of Goodnow Farms, inspects cacao beans at the source

Monica and Tom Rogan, co-owners of Goodnow Farms, outside of their barn in Sudbury, MA

Monica and Tom Rogan, co-owners of Goodnow Farms, outside of their barn in Sudbury, MA

By using cacao processed at Goodnow Farms we were able to further tie Deciduous 2018 to the sense of place that this beer evokes. Their work creating sustainable, delicious chocolate here in our home state inspires us in both spirit and flavor. Expect warming, roasty dark cocoa notes in this year’s Deciduous thanks to the nibs we sourced from Sudbury.

Cacao beans are processed and converted to a finished product in Sudbury

Cacao beans are processed and converted to a finished product in Sudbury

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To further accentuate the Deciduous 2018 recipe, we utilized fig and Madagascar vanilla. Along with the cacao from Goodnow Farms, these ingredients bring layers of savory complexity and earthy sweetness to our yearly release. The final special ingredient was raw Piloncillo - a form of unrefined brown sugar cone with a flavor similar to molasses that is often used in Mexican cooking.

A raw Piloncillo sugar cone about to be added to Deciduous

A raw Piloncillo sugar cone about to be added to Deciduous

The production team prepares the fig

The production team prepares the fig

Bottles of Deciduous 2018 will hit both Trillium Canton and Trillium Fort Point today. Can’t wait to share this once-a-year recipe with you, while celebrating the season that only us New Englanders truly get to experience. Cheers!

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Creating a West Coast Double IPA with Heidi Geist from The 48 Beer Project
Oct
22
10:30 AM10:30

Creating a West Coast Double IPA with Heidi Geist from The 48 Beer Project

Today’s release is a little something new and unexpected: Headlong is a West Coast-style double IPA brewed with Simcoe and Centennial hops. This beer is the 4th entry in the 48 Beer Project created by artist and designer Heidi Geist. It was a no-brainer for us to sign on as the Massachusetts representative for the project - what a great opportunity to collaborate and try something new!

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For those unfamiliar with Heidi’s project, it’s a must follow. She’s working with 48 breweries across the US to create beers and design awesome labels. The retro-fitted bus that she calls home rolled in to our Canton parking lot a few weeks ago, and we got the chance to design a new recipe for the occasion.

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As we began to wrap our heads around her project, we got to discussing the West Coast IPA - Heidi originally hails from the other side of the country, and there’s plenty that we love about the bright, floral qualities of Pacific Northwest hops. What’s more, this style shifts the focus outside of our usual comfort zone - a process that speaks to the goals of the 48 Beer Project. As Heidi puts it, “For me, this project is a means to both nurture relationships within the craft beer community, as well as create new experiences that offer a little shift in perspective, both in and exclusive of the industry.”

Ultimately, we came up with Headlong, a beer that’s all about engaging new ideas with a forward-thinking mindset. Heidi did just that when planning the 48 Beer Project, and we tried to take her lead by pushing forward with a different take on the IPAs we usually brew. And since we’re driven by intrigue, we split off a small portion of the beer and followed our usual process to see what the prototypical Trillium version of this beer might taste like in comparison. That experiment - known as Headlong: Detour - will be a draft only release at the taproom!

The label for Headlong was beautifully designed by Heidi. Inside the can, expect notes of freshly zested orange, ripe peach and a touch of piney bitterness. Cheers to an awesome and exciting project - safe travels Heidi!

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Bringing Illustration to Life
Sep
12
3:30 PM15:30

Bringing Illustration to Life

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This weekend we show that collaborations are possible with all sorts of partners, even magazines! To celebrate 25 years of Cook’s Illustrated magazine, we worked with the teams at CI and America’s Test Kitchen to conceptualize and brew an IPA featuring a variety of Massachusetts-grown malt from Valley Malt. Tomorrow night we’ll be sharing Illustrated for the first time at CI’s anniversary celebration, but the roots of this project go far deeper that just one beer.

The Cook’s Illustrated team visits Trillium on brew day

The Cook’s Illustrated team visits Trillium on brew day


As a couple of young foodies obsessed with quality and with an appetite for learning, Trillium founders Esther and JC Tetreault have long held a subscription to Cook’s Illustrated. The focus on technique, process and education pushed their culinary interest forward, while bringing many a delicious meal to the table. JC’s approach to gardening and homebrewing was reflected in the intentionality of each Cook’s Illustrated recipe, and the foundation for Trillium Brewing was similarly built on the same process-based method. Years into the brewery’s life, Cook’s Illustrated back issues are a mainstay on the shelves (and walls) of the Tetreault home.

John Burgoyne’s illustrations on display at the Tetreault house

John Burgoyne’s illustrations on display at the Tetreault house


Recipe formulation isn’t the only place that Cook’s Illustrated’s inspiration can be identified at Trillium. Esther and JC worked with Kevin Cimo, co-founder of Fair Folk and the creative hand behind Trillium’s labels, to reimagine CI’s signature style. The intricate sketches that accompanied many a “how-to” and “here’s-why” in the magazine’s pages were kept in mind as the visual identity of Trillium Brewing came to life. When it came time to bring the label for Illustrated to life John Burgoyne took the lead, working John Torres from Cook’s Illustrated on direction and Kevin Cimo on layout in order to unite the two organizations’ styles, while paying tribute to the impact CI has had on Trillium.

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We couldn’t be happier to take part in the Cook’s Illustrated celebration this weekend. Tickets are still available for the 25th anniversary party, and we hope you’ll join us to enjoy delicious food and the first pours of Illustrated at Friday and Saturday’s events. Stay tuned for details about the release of this collaboration in cans at our breweries - we look forward to showcasing wonderful local ingredients and a partnership that speaks to our history.

Cheers!

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Our New England Farmhouse Brewery
Sep
10
8:00 AM08:00

Our New England Farmhouse Brewery

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Today, we’re excited to officially publicize steps towards one of our biggest goals: Trillium Farm & Brewery. This summer we bought a beautiful farm in North Stonington, CT, less than two hours drive from our homes in Boston and Canton. Although this milestone announcement comes nestled between a summer that saw us host our first Field Trip festival, and a fall that brings the opening of our Fort Point restaurant, Trillium Farm & Brewery has been in the works for many a season.

We always dreamt of building our future and a New England farmhouse brewery not far from the venue where we were married in a pastoral region of CT. To actually establish roots for Trillium, we opened in our tiny downtown Boston home in Fort Point. But we stayed true to the vision: sourcing from our neighbors whenever possible, brewing with the seasons, and representing styles that speak to our region’s agricultural heritage. Trillium is a reflection of the rich landscape and history of New England.

Trillium Farm & Brewery will mirror the same values, with an immense capacity to expand our community impact. Our intention is to brew estate-grown beers, establish an agriculture program to feed our restaurant and breweries, and create a destination for you to share experiences with us, family, and friends. Trillium is our way of life, we have a spirit and a culture that flows beyond the glass. Our last few years have been spent building a team and creating events to share with you, and we look forward to continuing that mission for years to come.

For as long as it took us to find our perfect farmland, it will take just as long to build the brewery, prepare for events, and develop the agriculture program of our dreams. Our imminent focus is on opening our brewery and restaurant in Fort Point to continue our goal of creating community spaces to share Trillium with family and friends. We’re excited about the ability we finally have to connect all of our experiences in time: think fresh produce from the farm for dinner on the roof deck in Fort Point while drinking Congress Street IPA packaged that morning in Canton.

We’ll have plenty of stories, discoveries, and new challenges along the way that we can’t wait to share with you. You are part of our story, and this chapter is shaping up to be a special one.

Cheers!

Esther & JC

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The Power of Permutation
Jul
10
6:00 PM18:00

The Power of Permutation

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Mathematically speaking, permutations represent fundamental change based on the rearrangement of existing elements. Our Permutation Series was born from a similar spirit - highlighting experimental recipes and concepts from across the brewing spectrum in the constant pursuit of better beer. From a wild ale brewed with apple juice, to a double IPA with orange peel, vanilla, and lactose, to a traditional German-style weizenbock, we have continued to develop classic styles while pushing the limits of new techniques and technology. We’re sure many of you are curious where it’s all going...

Two years and 50+ Permutations ago we set out to create a brewers playground. A series that would continually allow us to explore our obsessions, iterate on our learnings, and break new ground on a small-batch scale. As different members of the production and lab departments contributed to the Permutation Series the creative potential continued to grow, and these focused contributions have expanded Trillium’s breadth. You may have read about (and tasted) evolutions in the fermentation profile of our hoppy beers that began in the Permutation program. A bit of space to investigate new ideas has resulted in concepts that may not have found a place otherwise. Meanwhile - these releases help us ensure that the can, bottle and draft lists stay fresh and exciting, whether folks are stopping in for the second time this year or the second time this week.

Ultimately, the goal is to learn more about what beers are universally compelling. What do we love creating and what do you love drinking? The Permutations that hit on all cylinders won’t stop at a Number - they’ll return with fully developed personalities. Think of our Permutation releases as sneak peeks at what might be future entries in the Trillium lexicon. Speaking of which...the end of this week will bring to life a new series of beers born from the Permutation line. Stay tuned for details about when that ferry will leave the harbor, as well as some new recipes that we’ve been hard at work on!

As always, thanks for drinking and letting us know what you’re thinking.

 

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Evolving Our Fermentation
May
21
4:00 PM16:00

Evolving Our Fermentation

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To us it feels like Trillium has been around forever, even though it’s only been 5 years. JC started as a homebrewer driven to experiment, create new recipes, try new techniques, to brew the beers he wanted to enjoy. 

Remember when we made a single 1/2bbl for the first release of Double Dry-hopped Fort Point Pale Ale back in July 2013 for the Hop Head Throwdown at The Publick House? Even though at the time we thought, "This is crazy …no way can we make an enjoyably drinkable beer hoppier than this one" at the same time we knew we were just getting started. Then we made Heavy Mettle in August 2014 and then Headroom in August 2015. And while we are incredibly proud of our team and celebrate what we've accomplished so far, we are still perpetually energized by the creative pursuit of getting better. 

We designed the Permutation program to permit us room to stretch, revise and explore and make room in our crazy lives to ensure we keep having more and more 'Headroom moments'. As expected, we’ve had some misses in the Permutation program that don't see the light of day, but by and large we've experienced several energizing leaps forward in learning and creativity that allows us to keep getting better. We thought a particular big leap forward occurred recently in the Permutation program and we felt strongly that it should apply it to not only to new beers but also some of our existing brands. When we hit it out of the park we definitely high five each other...and then immediately settle back down to ask “What can we do to improve?” We only release beer that we feel in our hearts, our fans will enjoy but at the same time stay perennially open-minded about the need to improve.  The feedback we’ve received on the Permutation program from our quality team, retail team, and fans has validated that this exploration to always strive toward better beer is the most important thing we do at Trillium.

 

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Making the Switch to 330ml
Apr
29
5:00 PM17:00

Making the Switch to 330ml

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Exciting packaging update, folks… We’re moving to 330ml bottles!

While we feel the nostalgic romance when opening a beautiful 750ml, sometimes you just don’t want to drink 25ish ounces of a bold, complex 11% stout, amirite? You also might not want to share that liquid gold with someone else just because you crave a taste (no judgment).

Reminiscent of the 375ml format we used for our first packaged beers in 2013, we selected a sleek 330ml bottle as our newest format. We believe this shift will create a more welcoming format for lighter travel, easier consumption, and give the opportunity to take home a wider variety of styles. The same quantity of beer will mean double the bottles per batch so hopefully more people will have access as well!

Our debut launch is Lineage Wheat Wild Saison.

You will occasionally see the 750ml as vintage releases for Cellar Sunday, special events, a few yet to be released beers and likely on the menu at our soon-to-open restaurant in Fort Point (stay tuned…)

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Watch out... Women at Work!
Apr
2
11:30 AM11:30

Watch out... Women at Work!

Strong and powerful women are all around us, in every industry. Craft beer is no different. In my short (five year) tenure in this business I’ve met incredible, inspiring, and influential women in all sectors:

These women are hard-working and passionate like many others in the world. The difference is that they are viewed as exceptions, not the norm. They, like me, are referenced as “women in craft beer” instead of just “Powerhouses of Industry.” Why do we need to be qualified by gender?

I’m not a person who defines myself by labels. I have qualities, interests, and core values and I choose to surround myself with positive, inspiring, and supportive people. I don’t think any two humans are exactly the same but I believe any two people can find something in common. I believe in equal opportunity and I work hard to create such an environment.

I have a five-year-old daughter who wants to “be Mommy” when she grows up. As heart-melting as that sounds, I know she means that she wants to have a family and work at Trillium with me. She pretends to pour beer instead of tea at her make-believe parties and she loves to come to the brewery to clean (start ‘em young). I love her completely uninhibited, unbiased confidence that she can do whatever she wants in this world and I’m proud that I’m one of her strongest influences. I will dedicate my life to keep that belief a reality for her.

When I look around Trillium I see plenty of incredible women. There could be more, though. I’m honored to participate in Trillium's first Pink Boots brew with the talented Ladies of Trillium to help assist in the education and career advancement of female beer industry professionals. I want Trillium to be a place where anyone would feel welcome. If we can have a little fun and raise money to support the advancement of that cause I’m ALL IN.

 

- Esther Tetreault

 

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Fated Farmer
Feb
25
7:30 PM19:30

Fated Farmer

From The Earth

I grew up working in the garden with both of my grandfathers. I loved working alongside them and developed an early respect for our earth and a genuine interest in horticulture. Through quiet observation, my fascination grew with each seasonal cycle. After the leaves fell each Autumn, I’d turn to my mom's landscaping books and winter seed and bulb catalogs. I memorized latin names and growing methods for my favorite plants, particularly those in our hardiness zone. I’d pick favorites and sketch landscape designs, always tucking in an herb garden into the perennial border. In early Spring, I'd cut a new planting bed with my mom to practice dividing Siberian Irises and Daffodil bulbs. We had great fun hunting for little red seedlings hiding in the carpet of evergreen pachysandra under Pepere’s huge Japanese Maple. We transplanted these seedlings to my parents’ landscape where these tiny, fragile descendants would grow over decades into living monuments of the care we took that day.

In high school my passion for plants expanded to the always-better-than-the-grocery-store produce that would come from our family gardens. I took the few elective culinary classes that were available and added classic cookbooks to the rotation, experimenting at home with riffs on the recipes learned in class. I thought I would go on to Johnson & Wales to become a chef. In my sophomore year my aunt took me to a food festival in Providence, which showed me the dizzying depth of creativity, technique, and ingredients. I met Julia Child! She signed my copy of her cookbook! I was determined to feel the same exhilaration I saw in those cooks, proudly presenting their joy of discovery.

Cooking seemed to be a clear career path that could allow me to explore a burgeoning passion and discipline. Looking at the world around me, farming seemed more like an unsustainable relic of what people used to do before modern agribusiness took hold; I convinced myself I would always be able to dig in my own garden and landscape to scratch that itch.

But harsh reality set in, as I learned what life was like for a chef, and I got scared: working nights and weekends, opposing schedules from my family and friends. I had witnessed how difficult that flip was for my dad, a policeman in Acushnet and a 2nd shift dye chemist at a textile factory in Fall River. I convinced myself that making food for my family and friends would be enough. I went on to study Biology and Biochemistry. After college I moved to Boston to dive headlong into a successful career in clinical research management.

M20

When I lived in Boston in my 20’s, I was the proud caretaker of a little 16 by 24 foot patch of earth, number M20, in the heart of the historic Fenway Victory Gardens. Plot M20 was perfectly positioned at the end of a path with terrific southern exposure, protected from the street and city. Walking down the path, hauling garden tools and small, mail order perennials, working in M20 satisfied the need to get my hands in the earth; to nurture life. I grew both edible and decorative plants, including a few special young trees with the goal of growing them to move to land of my own someday. But as time went on, the trees grew larger and they pushed back on that intention and, again, my life plan shifted. After 7 years, I had to give up M20 when I moved out of Boston into Brookline (and married Esther!). I still didn’t have a house or land of my own, so those trees were transplanted and now thrive at my parents’ home.

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Fated Farmer

I continued to cook for family and friends. I discovered and fell in love with better beer at places like The Publick House and, naturally, I began homebrewing and fell deeper in love with beer than I had previously with food or farming. I also began dreaming of how I could bring all my passions and talents together in a harmonious way that made up for the compromises I had made until then. Esther was a fearless entrepreneur and endlessly supportive of realizing a vision to build and operate a farm & brewery together. Trillium was born! At least the vision for what it could one day become had taken form. We didn't have a farm in our family, nor the money to buy one. We did, however, have a mortgage and a son and a daughter on the way. Still, this future felt right. We took the leap and committed the entirety of our mid-30’s married couple life savings to Trillium. With the tireless help of friends and family, we hacked a brewery out of a run down 2,300 square foot space in Fort Point Channel, opening our doors for the first time in March 2013. There was no clear path to a farm, but we had our definitive starting point. Everyone’s life goal needs a first step and we trusted each other enough to take it together.

Five years go by in the blink of an eye after you open a brewery, and our lives have evolved in a way that we never could have imagined. After all this, I know that none of my previous decisions to step away from cooking or farming were actually compromises, but rather a certain prioritization to foundational dedication to family and patience. Being true to what I needed had in turn allowed me to become what Trillium needed from me. And with each passing day, we can more clearly see a path to Trillium becoming the New England Farm & Brewery of our dreams.

 

- Jean Claude Tetreault

 

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Belgian Pale Ale: Time Capsule
Feb
7
9:00 AM09:00

Belgian Pale Ale: Time Capsule

For me, beer often behaves as a time capsule. A certain beer, style, or flavor can wield the surprising power of sensory memory that allows me to relive a moment in time and space that I had otherwise forgotten. In this case it's a feeling of relaxation and total relief. 

Whenever I start to pour a Belgian Pale Ale, as that voluminous, rocky head starts to build and those distinctive spicy phenolic and fruity odors hit my nose, strong memories come rushing back of a ritual I adopted while traveling in Europe for my previous career in clinical research. I'd often find myself dead tired from red eye flights, driving for hours in a rental car, racing around from hotel to convention center to hospitals, then finally being able to collapse down at the nearest cafe. I would order a basket of frites and a pale ale from whatever the local brewery happened to be in the town. Lifting up the always matching brewery branded goblet and taking the first few gulps of the beer just beyond that huge foamy head, I could finally allow my jet lagged brain to transition away from the hectic day to the dream of bringing Trillium in to the world to offer exactly these kinds of relieving moments to weary travelers in Boston.

I hope Six has the same transportive power and can help to be part of new beer memories for those who try it.


-JC Tetreault

 

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Drink This Now: A Trillium Lager Brewed at Notch
Feb
1
11:30 AM11:30

Drink This Now: A Trillium Lager Brewed at Notch

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Story originally appeared here.

By Jacqueline Cain | January 31st, 2018

Trillium Brewing Co. is best known—and best loved—for its aromatic, opaque, American pale ales. They also make a mean stout, stellar sours—and lagers?

The first Trillium lager (besides some Permutation series experiments) “to see customers’ eyeballs,” as cofounder and brewer JC Tetreault puts it, is I Predict a Riot, a guest brew made on Notch Brewery’s lager-specific system on the North Shore. It hits draft lines at Trillium and Notch this weekend.

“I love almost all beers equally,” Tetreault says, laughing.

While the past five years have been spent brand-building then simply keeping up with insane demand mainly for its hop-driven ales, Trillium also continues to grow its production facility and capabilities in Canton. Later this year, it will add a 10-barrel system (and a restaurant, and rooftop deck…) in Fort Point. All the while, Tetreault and his team have been using their growing space to experiment and make pilot batches of a variety of things that haven’t been shared with fans just yet.

“The direction we see Trillium heading in will have a spectrum of offerings changing for the season, that changes for the place [it’s being served],” he says. (How does a hoppy lager sound for a summer day at the Garden on the Greenway?) “It’s more of a brewpub approach, [rather] than a production brewery approach. But we’re operating at the scale of a production brewery. It’s a tough combination.”

So, it’s a learning process—and who better to learn from than a lager specialist? Notch cofounder Chris Lohring, a 25-plus-year industry veteran, designed his Salem brewery with making traditional lagers in mind. He’s hosted a few fellow beer makers there for the Notch Guest Brew series—Clown Shoes, Idle Hands, and in the coming months, now-West Coast-based Ben Howe returns to make a redux of his now-defunct Enlightenment Ales, Lohring says.

On one had, the Notch Guest Brews help diversify the taproom lineup for consumers—like all Massachusetts breweries, Notch’s license only allows them to pour beers made onsite. It gives brewers a chance to work on equipment they might not otherwise have access to. But it also benefits Lohring and his team.

“To be able to spend a couple days with JC, picking his brain, for us has been a good learning experience, because we do hazy pale ales,” Lohring says. “People thought, from Notch, that was a little odd, but it really fits what we do. They’re session strength, hazy pale ales that are wonderfully flavorful and aromatic… I love that. As much as [Tetreault] was able to learn a bit about lagering up here, I was able to learn just as much from what those guys are doing.”

I Predict a Riot isn’t as hazy as a typical Trillium brew, and at 6.5 percent alcohol-by-volume, it isn’t as sessionable as a Notch.

“It’s delicious,” Lohring says.

With a fair amount of malted wheat and a little British malt character, the grain bill harkens back to the first-ever hoppy pale ale Trillium made, Fort Point. It also uses “all Citra [hops], all day,” Tetreault says (Fort Point Pale Ale is a blend of Citra and Columbus hops). But the key difference is the yeast. For this hoppy lager, Tetreault used a Bavarian lager strain favored by Lohring.

“It’s not a purist’s traditional lager, but it’s a really well-done beer,” Lohring says.

Will it cause a riot? Maybe, with the buzz both Trillium and Notch elicit. But the name—a Kaiser Chiefs song title, one of Tetreault’s favorites—is actually a reference to the two brewers coming together, Tetreault says.

“[Lohring is] clearly super passionate about what he does, as are we. It felt inspirational that we can both really respect what the other does, even though he doesn’t choose to make the same kind of beers we do, and we don’t stick to super traditional session styles,” Tetreault says. “When you bring these two things together, there’s gonna be some animation.”

Trillium and Notch team up on a series of launch parties for I Predict a Riot: at Trillium Garden at the Substation this Saturday, Feb. 3, and at the Salem taproom on Sunday, Feb. 4. The 20-barrel batch will be available at Trillium’s Canton and Roslindale taprooms, and for growler fills at its Canton and Boston locations beginning Saturday. It’s on draft and in crowlers at Notch beginning Sunday.

Saturday, February 3, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Trillium Garden at the Substation, 4228 Washington St., trilliumbrewing.com.

Sunday, February 4, noon-6 p.m., Notch Brewery & Taproom, 283 Derby St., Salem, 978-238-9060, notchbrewing.comFacebook.

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Nov
17
9:00 AM09:00

A Trillium Garden is coming to Roslindale Village!

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November 17th, 2017- Trillium Brewing Company, in partnership with Roslindale Village Main Street, is excited to announce plans to operate an indoor winter beer garden in the iconic Roslindale Substation Building.

The Trillium Garden at the Substation is slated to open in early December 2017 and will run through the winter season. In the heart of Roslindale Village, the beer garden will be an indoor venue open five days a week, serving a variety of rotating draft options. The location accommodates open seating, community space, and a limited number of private event opportunities. 

“We had a killer time with the Garden on the Greenway this summer so we jumped at the chance to bring Trillium to another Boston neighborhood,” said Trillium co-owner Esther Tetreault. “Our goal has always been to build a strong community and share what we do. The Substation is such a unique and iconic space, in a welcoming neighborhood, making Roslindale a perfect winter home for the Trillium Garden.” 

“Beer aficionados will have the unique opportunity to drink Trillium’s award-winning beer in the Substation’s awe-inspiring space, with its 34 foot ceilings, 18-foot copper clad doors, 250-ton capacity gantry crane, and six two-story windows,” said Alia Hamada Forrest, RVMS’s Executive Director. “Where Trillium goes, its fans follow. I’m eager to welcome the newcomers that will discover Roslindale’s existing mix of vibrant restaurants and retail options, and hope that these types of creative partnerships continue to spark across all of Boston Main Street districts. We know when you visit — you will want to return.”  

The Roslindale Substation (designed by architect Robert Peabody of Peabody and Stearns with Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation) was built in 1911 and is one of six nearly identical converter substations built in and around Boston at that time to convert alternating current (A/C) electricity from the Boston Elevated Railway’s South Boston power plant to direct current (D/C) power for use by the trolley system. Service was discontinued in 1971 and the space remained unused until 2014 when the $4.8 million Substation renovation project was conceived and undertaken by Historic Boston Inc., Roslindale Village Main Street, Peregrine Group, LLC of Rumford, RI, and architect Prellwitz Chilinski Associates of Cambridge. In January 2017, Craft Beer Cellar opened on the lower level of the substation, ending the 46 year vacancy. Trillium’s tenancy on the main floor of the building will revive a prominent corner and reactivate the historic space. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic places. 

Project planning is underway and an opening date will be announced soon. Stay tuned to the Trillium Garden Twitter and webpage for updates!
 

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New Growler Policy (Starting on July 23, 2017)
Jul
22
9:00 AM09:00

New Growler Policy (Starting on July 23, 2017)

The Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission recently announced updates to the statewide growler laws, so we've reviewed & revised our growler filling processes & equipment, taking into consideration your requests to fill other containers while retaining the highest possible quality & maintaining speed of service. Our new growler policy, listed below, will go into effect on Sunday, July 23rd, 2017 at both breweries upon open. Please read carefully and let us know if anything needs clarification... we'll see you soon!


In addition to the 32oz & 64oz Trillium branded glass growlers sold at both breweries, starting on Sunday, July 23rd, 2017 we will now also fill any other non-branded growlers in the following sizes:

  • 32 oz (with a 33.3MM diameter mouth)
  • 64 oz (with a 38 MM diameter mouth)

Please note: 

We will provide, free of charge, new growler caps that fit 33.3MM (Boston Round) and 38MM (Standard Growler). If these caps don't fit your blank container, chances are our counter pressure growler filling apparatus will not fully/properly seat within the container opening. If our filling apparatus does not fit the container opening, we cannot counter pressure fill to maintain highest possible quality (by maintaining target CO2 volumes while simultaneously minimizing oxygen pick-up). Nor can we fill that container quickly or without significant loss, so we may need to refuse that container.
 
Additionally:

  • We will only fill clean growlers! We reserve the right to refuse any growlers that aren't clean.
  • In accordance with MA ABCC guidance, the growler cannot have any other stickers, markings, or tags on it. It must be completely free of any branding (brewery or otherwise, unless it is our official Trillium branded glass).
  • Container must be manufactured as an intended beer container.
  • We will not partially fill a container (ie. put 32oz into a 64oz container). In order to maintain quality, we must fill to the minimum target volume of that 32 or 64oz container.
  • Containers will be reviewed for any visual defects and may be refused if there is a chip, crack or any type of flaw that may cause the growler to fail during the filling process or after it is filled.
  • Container volume must be visibly indicated by the manufacturer. 
  • Growlers must be brown, translucent glass so our staff can easily monitor the liquid level inside as it fills. We will NOT fill non-brown glass, stainless steel growlers or any other opaque vessels. 


We are happy to take a step towards making our beer more accessible, while retaining our commitment to maximizing beer quality and speed of service! Now... let's get to filling!

 

 

 

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Trillium Garden on The Greenway Opens!
Jun
1
3:00 PM15:00

Trillium Garden on The Greenway Opens!

After a busy month of planning & building, Trillium Brewing Company and the Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy are ready to open The Trillium Garden on the Greenway! The seasonal open-air beer garden, which will run weekly through October, is free to the public with draft beer & wine available for purchase. 

Please click here to visit the Trillium Garden's website and to read more about hours, location, menu, etc.

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